Constitutional Law

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85.4
Citizens of the State
Maeve Glass
Associate Professor of Law, Columbia Law School

For helpful comments on earlier drafts, many thanks to Tomiko Brown-Nagin, Jessica Bulman-Pozen, Christine Desan, Einer Elhauge, Elizabeth F. Emens, Marie-Amélie George, Noah Glass, Jeffrey Gordon, Annette Gordon-Reed, Jamal Greene, Ariela J. Gross, Hendrik Hartog, Bert I. Huang, Freya Irani, Olatunde C. Johnson, Jeremy Kessler, Ryan Liss, Kenneth W. Mack, Jane Manners, Henry P. Monaghan, Shaun Ossei-Owusu, Christina Duffy Ponsa-Kraus, Vlad Perju, David Pozen, Alex Raskolnikov, Martha A. Sandweiss, Carol Sanger, Matthew A. Shapiro, Emily Stolzenberg, Sarah L. Swan, Sean Wilentz, and Rebecca E. Zietlow, as well as the editors of The University of Chicago Law Review and participants in the Columbia
Law School Associates and Fellows Workshop, the Harvard Legal History Workshop, and the American Society for Legal History.

In the midst of a New England winter long ago, young people of Boston filed into a drafty meeting hall up the road from the harbor.1

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Article
Severing Unconstitutional Amendments
James Durling
Yale Law School, JD Candidate, 2018
E. Garrett West
Yale Law School, JD Candidate, 2018

Thanks to John Brinkerhoff, Abbe Gluck, Ted Lee, Daryl Levinson, Scott Levy, and Mike Showalter for helpful comments and conversations. Thanks also to the careful editors at the University of Chicago Law Review. All errors are our own.

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Article
85.2
Autocratic Legalism
Kim Lane Scheppele
Laurance S. Rockefeller Professor of Sociology and International Affairs in the Woodrow Wilson School and University Center for Human Values, Princeton University

Research for this Essay was conducted while the author was Visiting Professor of Law and John Harvey Gregory Lecturer on World Organization, Harvard Law School, Spring 2017. She would like to thank the members of the Group on Autocratic Legalism (GOAL) at Harvard Law School, particularly Cem Tecimer, Isabel Roby, and Jakub Jozwiak for their excellent research assistance on Turkey, Venezuela, and Poland, respectively, as well as Mark Tushnet, Vicki Jackson, Scott Brewer, Oren Tamir, and others who attended these sessions for providing both a sounding board and new cases to consider. For valuable research assistance on Hungary, she would also like to thank Panna Balla of Harvard Law School and Cassie Emmons and Miklós Bánkuti, currently and formerly of Princeton. She also appreciates the daily counsel of Jan-Werner Müller, Dan Kelemen, Laurent Pech, Dimitry Kochenov, Tomasz Koncewicz, and Gábor Halmai for constant exchanges on these topics in real time. And she thanks participants in the symposium organized by Tom Ginsburg and Aziz Huq on The Limits of Constitutionalism, as well as the editors of The University of Chicago Law Review for insightful suggestions.

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85.2
The Wrong Rights, or: The Inescapable Weaknesses of Modern Liberal Constitutionalism
Richard A. Epstein
Laurence A. Tisch Professor of Law, New York University School of Law; the Peter and Kirsten Bedford Senior Fellow, The Hoover Institution; and Senior Lecturer, The University of Chicago Law School

My thanks to Julia Haines and Manuel Valle, The University of Chicago Law School, Class of 2017, and Kenneth Hersey and Jonathan Povilonis, NYU School of Law, Class of 2018, for their usual excellent research assistance.

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85.2
Liberal Constitutionalism and Economic Inequality
Rosalind Dixon
Professor of Law, UNSW Sydney
Julie Suk
Professor of Law, Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law, Yeshiva University

Many thanks to Richard Briffault, Tom Ginsburg, Jamal Greene, Ran Hirschl, Richard Holden, Aziz Huq, David Landau, Sabeel Rahman, Kim Lane Scheppele, and Mila Versteeg for helpful comments and suggestions on earlier drafts of this Essay. Thanks are also due to Melissa Voigt for outstanding research assistance.